Panic Disorder: Causes & Treatment For Panic Attacks | Livescience

Chrsi Collingridge/AP Photo Copy Oscar Pistorius ‘ own psychiatric witness told a court today that the paraylmpic sprinter could be a danger to society if armed with a gun because of a life-long battle with a mental disorder that stemmed from having his legs amputated while he was an infant. The testimony of Dr. Merryl Vorster prompted prosecutor Gerrie Nel to indicate that he will ask that Pistorius undergo psychiatric evaluation. If the requested is approved, Pistorius would have to spend a month in a hospital being evaluated. Pistorius’ murder trial appeared to enter the final week of testimony today. He is charged with killing his girlfriend Reeva Steenkamp before dawn on Valentine’s Day 2013. Pistorius, 27, claims he mistook his lover for a burglar.
For the original version, visit http://abcnews.go.com/International/oscar-pistorius-shrink-leg-amputations-gave-mental-disorder/story?id=23677670

As their attacks become more frequent, their world gets smaller and smaller. About 6 million adult Americans suffer from varying degrees of panic disorder, with women being twice as likely to suffer from this mental health issue as men. While it can occur at any age, panic disorder commonly begins during late adolescence and early adulthood. Causes of panic disorder While researchers have not determined a specific cause of panic disorder in some individuals, many believe it is a combination of environmental and genetic factors. Family history seems to play a large role in determining who will suffer from a panic disorder. Researchers have identified several parts of the brain that are involved in fear and anxiety. Some scientists believe that people with panic disorder have an abnormality that causes them to misinterpret benign sensations as threats, causing their fear reaction to go into overdrive.
More: Panic Disorder: Causes & Treatment for Panic Attacks | LiveScience

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